Members

The President, Deputy Presidents, Professional Board Members and Community Board Members are ‘appointed’ Board members under the Corrective Services Act 2006 (the Act).  That is, they are appointed for fixed terms by the Governor-in-Council on the recommendation of the Minister.

The President is equivalent in experience and standing to a Supreme Court Justice and the Deputy Presidents equivalent to District Court Judges. The President and Deputy Presidents hold office for five years and may be reappointed but cannot hold office for more than 10 years.

The Professional Board Members hold office for a three-year term and may be reappointed. They must have a university or professional qualification that is relevant to the functions of the Board, such as a legal or medical qualification.

The Community Board Members hold office for a three-year term and may be reappointed. They do not require a formal qualification and are part-time roles. They represent the diversity of the Queensland community in their knowledge, expertise and experience.

The Police Representatives and the Public Service Representatives are ‘nominated’ Board members under the Act; they are nominated for transfer to the Board by the Commissioner of Police and the Commissioner of Queensland Corrective Services, respectively. Their service with the Board is usually for one to two years. The Public Service Representatives must have expertise or experience in probation and parole matters. These officers provide a vital operational link to the Board and support its primary consideration of community safety.

President & Deputy Presidents

President

Michael Byrne QC

Michael was appointed President on 3 July 2017. He holds a Bachelor of Laws and was admitted as a Barrister of the Supreme Court of Queensland in December 1977. Michael was appointed Queen’s Counsel in December 1993.

Michael practised extensively in the criminal justice field, appearing for the prosecution and defence in a number of very high-profile trials and some of the seminal High Court cases emanating from Queensland in criminal law.

Michael acted as the Director of Public Prosecutions and as a Judge of the District Court and was also the Commissioner for the Queensland Organised Crime Commission of Inquiry and the Vice President of the Queensland Bar Association.

Deputy President

Julie Sharp

Julie was appointed Deputy President on 3 July 2017. She was admitted as a barrister of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1999.

Julie started her career as a law clerk at Legal Aid Queensland in 1997 and ultimately progressed to in-house Counsel, which prepared her well for the move to the private bar in 2010. Julie also held the roles of in-house Counsel at Australia Meat Holdings Pty Ltd and as Counsel Assisting the Queensland State Coroner.

Julie is an experienced advocate, having appeared in criminal matters in all State courts and the High Court of Australia. She has been Counsel Assisting in several Commissions of Inquiry, Counsel representing the Attorney-General or Respondents in Dangerous Prisoner matters and has been involved in various Workplace Health and Safety and Environmental prosecutions.

Julie’s commitment to the criminal justice system over the past 20 years is also demonstrated by her volunteer work for various community legal centres and other pro bono work.

Deputy President

Mr Peter Shields

Peter Shields was appointed on 3 July 2017. He holds a Master of Laws (Public Law), a Bachelor of Laws and a Diploma in Legal Practice. He is admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland and the Supreme Court of New South Wales; as a practitioner of the High Court of Australia; and as a barrister and a solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand.

Prior to appointment, Peter was a leading criminal lawyer and before that he had a successful career as a Detective Sergeant in the Queensland Police Service. When appointed, Peter was accredited by the Queensland Law Society as a specialist in criminal law and was the Chair of the QLS Criminal Law Section Committee, of which he had been a member since 2010.

Professional Board Members

Carolyn McAnally was appointed Professional Board Member on 3 July 2017. She holds a Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Business (Public Sector Management) and was admitted as a barrister of the Supreme Court of Queensland in March 2001.

Carolyn has dedicated her career to the practice of criminal law and, more broadly, to the legislative reform of the criminal justice system. She worked in the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions for 10 years, including as a Crown Prosecutor; and thereafter in Strategic Policy and Legal Services, Department of Justice and Attorney-General for eight years before joining the Board. Her roles included Director leading the criminal law policy and legislation team.


Valentina McKenzie was appointed Professional Board Member on 29 November 2018. She holds a Bachelor of Laws and was admitted as a Barrister of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1994. Valentina has more than 25 years of practical legal experience. She has held positions in the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, including as Crown Prosecutor and, prior to appointment with the Board, was a Principal Legal Officer at Workplace Health & Safety Queensland, Prosecution Services.


Dean Clifford-Jones was admitted as a lawyer of the Supreme Court of Queensland during 2009. He is also admitted to the High Court of Australia. He has worked with the Office of Director of Child Protection Litigation and the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.


Simone Healy has been serving as a Supreme Court Bail Practitioner with Sisters Inside since 2016. Simone was admitted as a solicitor in 2005 and in the High Court of Australia in 2014 and has worked as a Senior Associate and a Legal Practice Director in private law firms.


Tracey Jackson has a Bachelor of Laws. She has been a prosecutions officer and Assistant Chief Inspector for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) since 2016. Tracey also served as a Queensland Police Officer between 1989 and 1997.

Community Board Members

The Membership of the Board must include a collection of members, the number of which is decided by the Minister, each of whom is to represent the Queensland community. Community Board Members are appointed by the Governor-in-Council on the recommendation of the Minister and in doing so the Minister must:

  • ensure the person is appropriately qualified to perform the functions of the role;
  • ensure the parole board represents the diversity of the Queensland community;
  • provide for balanced gender representation in membership; and
  • provide for the representation of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in the membership of the board.

Community Board Members hold office for three years, with the ability for reappointment, and it is a paid position. (See – Chapter 5, Part 2, Division 3, Corrective Services Act 2006).

The following is a snapshot of the diversity of Queenslanders who, together, make up the community membership of the Board:

Community Board Members

Kimina Andersen is both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, her heritage is to the Wuthathi (Cape York) Erub Island and Wakka communities. She holds a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Queensland and is the new Director of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health at the West Moreton Hospital and Health Service.


Tracey Barty has been a part-time member for the Mental Health Tribunal since 2002. Previously, Tracey was an Ordinary Member of the Veterans Review Board and was an external reviewer for the Child Death and Serious Case Reviews, Department of Child Safety. She has also been a part-time investigator with the Office of the Health Practitioners Registration Board.


Gary Bell is an Aboriginal man from the Wakka Tribal/Language group. He holds a Diploma of Correctional Administration. He is a Community Member of the Mental Health Tribunal and a previous Official Visitor for Queensland Corrective Services.


Marjorie Bloor holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, Politics and Indigenous Studies. She was the Chief Executive Officer of ARAFMI Queensland for 18 years until her retirement and a member of the Queensland Carers Advisory Council from 2009–2017.


Dr Kee Cheung OAM is a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Immunology and up until his retirement In January 2018, he was the Group Laboratory Manager of Pathology Queensland. Dr Cheung has strong ties with the Chinese community and, in recognition of his service to the community in Queensland, he was conferred the Queensland Multicultural Service Award in 2000 and the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in 2013.


Chiu-Hing Chan holds a Master of Journalism, a Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of International Relations, and is an admitted solicitor. In 2009, Chiu-Hing was awarded Young Queenslander of the Year and in 2010 he was nominated as Young Australian of the Year for crime prevention and leadership in the Chinese community. He was appointed to the National Board of Directors for White Ribbon Australia and was the founding Chair of the Queensland White Ribbon Committee. He is also an appointed Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal Justice of the Peace (Legal).


Lincoln Crowley QC is an Aboriginal man and descendant of the Waramungu peoples of Tennant Creek, Northern Territory. He is a barrister in full-time practice at the private bar and holds a Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of Arts (Political Science). In 2018 he was the first indigenous person to be appointed as Queen’s Counsel in and for the State of Queensland.


Jennifer Cullen is an Aboriginal woman and descendant of the Bidjara and Wakka people. She is an Adjunct Associate Professor at James Cook University and Griffith University, and the CEO of Synapse Australia (formerly known as, Brain Injury Association of Queensland). Since 2013, she has held a leading role as a Council Member of the Independent Advisory Council to the National Disability Insurance Agency and a Member of the National Disability and Carers’ Advisory Council.


Nicole Cullen holds a Bachelor of Laws and was admitted as a solicitor in 2002. She is the Principal Solicitor and Director at McKays Solicitors in Mackay, managing the family and domestic violence division and criminal law division. Nicole is also a nationally accredited mediator and accredited family dispute resolution practitioner.


Dr Michelle Denton is a registered nurse and is a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Social Policy and Social Work. She is an Adjunct Senior Lecturer at the University of Queensland and an independent health consultant providing services to a range of government and non-government agencies. Dr Denton has researched, written and published on a range of topics such as: prisoner to community transition, and outcomes of community-based support for mentally ill prisoners.


Dr Colin Dillon AM APM is an Aboriginal man and descendant of the Kombumerri people of the Yugambeh nation whose traditional country covers all of Gold Coast and its surrounding areas. Dr Dillon was the first of his people to join a police force in Australia and served for 36 years as a uniformed officer and plain clothes officer. In 1992, he was awarded the Australian Police Medal (APM) in recognition of his distinguished service to the Queensland Police Service. From 2003 to 2006, he was the Senior Adviser on Indigenous Affairs to the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships (Qld). In 2000, he received an honorary doctorate from the Queensland University of Technology. In 2013, he was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for his services to the Indigenous community.


Amanda Doyle is an Aboriginal woman and descendant of the Wiradjuri Tribal/Language group. She holds a double degree from the University Technology Sydney: Bachelor of Arts and Adult Education and Aboriginal Community Management. She is the CEO of the Home Assist Community Service and previously worked as the Senior Training Coordinator for the Taminmin College, Northern Territory.


Jo-Anne Fitchett holds a Bachelor of Laws and was admitted as a solicitor in 1983. Previously, she held the position of Deputy President of the Central and Northern Queensland Regional Parole Board.


Ronald Fogarty identifies as a Bijara Man.  Ron has previously worked in a number of roles within both the Commonwealth and State Governments.  Most recently he worked with Queensland South Native Title Services, in this role he chaired Native Title Meetings as well as Facilitating mediation between Native Title Holders.


Kevin Francis is married with three children and two grandchildren. He has served with the Australian Army and also had an extensive career of over 36 years with the Queensland Police Service.  He was appointed to Detective in 1997 and performed investigative duties predominantly in the child protection field. In 2006 he was appointed as the inaugural Police Investigation Management Officer to the Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.  In 2015 he was promoted to Detective Senior Sergeant with the Fraud and Cyber Crime Group, State Crime Command.  In August 2017 he commenced duty as a Police Representative on the Parole Board Queensland which he continued with until October 2018.  He retired from the Queensland Police Service in March 2019.


Robert Hastings APM was appointed Commissioner of Corrections Victoria from 2009–2012 and Assistant Commissioner of Victoria Police from 2003–2009. Robert has also provided consultancy and advisory services in community safety-related matters in Fiji and Indonesia, and locally in Queensland. In 2002, he was awarded an Australian Police Medal (APM) for distinguished service.


Simone Healy has been serving as a Supreme Court Bail Practitioner with Sisters Inside since 2016. Simone was admitted as a solicitor in 2005 and in the High Court of Australia in 2014 and has worked as a Senior Associate and a Legal Practice Director in private law firms.


William Ivinson is of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent, an Elder of the Murrin Ger Language Group at Wadeye, Northern Territory, and a descendant member of the Darnley (Erub) Island community. He has over forty years of experience within the Criminal Justice System and holds a Graduate Certificate in Criminology and Justice from Griffith University. Most recently he was Senior Advisor, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Queensland Family and Child Commission.


Simone Jackson is an Aboriginal woman and descendant of the Kamilaroi and Barunggam Nations with strong links to south west Queensland including Oakey, Dalby and Gatton. She has over 25 years experience in the public sector across many human service portfolios, such as: corrections, youth justice, child protection and Indigenous affairs. She is Executive Director, Culture and Economic Participation, Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships.


Tracey Jackson has a Bachelor of Laws. She has been a prosecutions officer and Assistant Chief Inspector for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) since 2016. Tracey also served as a Queensland Police Officer between 1989 and 1997.


Karl Mackenzie is an Aboriginal man and descendant of the Parundji people of north western New South Wales, and a proud Koori man. Karl was appointed to the Southern Queensland Regional Parole Board and the Central and Northern Queensland Regional Parole Board. He is also the Chair of the Townsville Community Justice Group and is a respected Aboriginal Elder in the Townsville community.


Peter Maher OAM was the CEO for St Vincent de Paul Society, Northern Territory from 2016 and the CEO for St Vincent de Paul Society, Queensland from 2005, until his retirement in 2019. Previously, Peter held senior management positions with Centrelink, the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In 2011, he received the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for outstanding achievement and service to the community.


Jocelyn Manique is a Chartered Accountant and has more than 22 years experience in audit, investment, finance and governance. Jocelyn is the Chair of the Executive Committee of the Grace College Council at the University of Queensland.


Edward Monaei is a descendant from the Kaurareg people from Cape York Peninsular and a descendant from the Meriam people of Mer Island. He holds a Post Graduate Degree in Public Sector Management and in the process of completing a Masters in Business Administration through the Queensland University of Technology. Edward is a member of the Queensland Police Services, Policing Board, Chairman of the Queensland Rugby League, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Indigenous Advisory Committee and a member of the auspicious Australian Rugby League Indigenous Advisory Council. Edward is a recognised and acknowledged Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Leader throughout Queensland, and has championed a number of initiatives across the Queensland Government sector to implement cultural capability practices into their business systems and operations.


Gregory (Greg) Moroney was admitted as a solicitor in 1976. He is the Chair of the Legal Practitioners Admissions Board in Queensland and the Queensland Supreme Court’s representative on the National Law Admissions Consultative Committee. He is the Deputy Chair of LifeTec Australia, a not-for-profit organisation providing dedicated assistive technology services to enable people of all ages and abilities to actively engage in home, work, school and community life.


Francine O’Rourke is a descendant of the Yidinji Aboriginal group of whose land and sea country generally covers the southern corridor from Cairns to Babinda, Innisfail, Trinity Inlet, Yarrabah and Russell River as well as parts of the Atherton tablelands. Francine also has South Sea Islander heritage through her maternal grandmother, and it is also through this side of the family that Francine has Torres Strait Islander kinship and networks. Francine is the Indigenous Investigation Conciliation and Outreach Officer with the Energy and Water Ombudsman Queensland. She is also Co-Vice Chair of the Cairns White Ribbon Committee. Francine hosts the radio program, The Yarning Circle every Saturday on the Cairns Community Radio Network, which highlights good-news stories from and about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and individuals.


Kerry Rees holds a Bachelor of Laws and was admitted as a solicitor in 2006. She runs a legal office in Yungaburra, Queensland and was previously employed as Principal Solicitor with the Queensland Family Violence Legal Service (Cairns, Townsville, and Mount Isa) and as a solicitor with an Indigenous Family Violence Service in Roma. Prior to her legal career, Kerry was also employed as a Corrective Services Officer and Probation and Parole Officer from 1996–2005.


Miranda Reid is an accredited mental health social worker, with more than 20 years of experience, including supporting sufferers of mental health issues, domestic violence, homelessness and family reconciliation. She has been a private practitioner since 2013. Miranda is a board member of Teen Challenge Queensland, which provides residential rehabilitation programs for people with life-controlling drug addictions.


Maxine Renouf APM is an Aboriginal woman and descendant of the Kamilaroi people. She has had an extensive career in the Queensland Police Service (QPS), including as police negotiator. She was the first Indigenous female to be inducted into the (QPS) in 1976 and was promoted to commissioned officer in 2006. Maxine is a recipient of the Australian Police Medal (APM), the National Emergency Service Medal (ESM) and Commissioner’s Medal for Meritorious Service.


Malcolm Renouf is a proud Aboriginal man and descendant of the Gubbi Gubbi people and descendant of Queen Maria of Childers whose traditional country covers parts of South East Queensland. Malcolm served in the Australian Regular Army and later in the Queensland Police Service where he retired as a police officer in 2011 but stayed on in an administrative role until the completion of the G20 Summit in Brisbane in 2014. As a police officer, Malcolm held numerous roles including Officer-in-Charge at Sunnybank, Holland Park Prosecutions and Crime Stoppers, as well as field training officer and mentor to numerous Indigenous police recruits. Malcolm has vast experience engaging with Indigenous and other multicultural communities.


Amanda Ritchie has more than 35 years of experience working at senior levels in the Australian public service and currently holds a contracted position as General Manager, YWCA Queensland, (formerly, Young Women’s Christian Association). Amanda also held the position of General Manager, CRS Australia (formerly, Commonwealth Rehabilitation Services Australia) from 2012–2015. In 2015, she received the Public Service Medal in recognition of her public service.


Raymond (Matt) Saunders is an Aboriginal man from the Tribal/Language groups, Kamilaroi and Bigambul. He holds a Bachelor of Laws from Central Queensland University. Matt has had an extensive career in the Queensland Police Service specialising in Legal and Prosecuting. Prior to his retirement in 2019, he was a Police Representative on the Parole Board Queensland.  He was admitted as a Solicitor in August 2019.


Sue Scheinpflug extensive experience as a CEO and has held advisory and policy development roles across all levels of government. Most recently she was CEO of Brisbane South Primary Health Network. Sue is currently Chair of Brisbane Diamantina Health Partners, a Board Member of West Moreton Health, and Member of the Queensland Mental Health Commission – Mental Health and Drug Advisory Council. Sue holds qualifications in education and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. She has won awards as a business and community leader, including the 2009 Queensland Telstra Business Woman of the Year Award.


Tamara Solomon is an Aboriginal woman and has been adopted into the Kuku Yalanji clan. Tamara is currently a care coordinator with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS). She holds a Diploma in Community Service Management: Family and Community Services from the TAFE South Bank.


Gyl Stacey holds a Bachelor of Business and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.  She has more than 35 years experience working in public and private leadership positions, including 10 years experience working in the Queensland Police Service. Gyl is the Deputy Chair of the Board of Spinal Life Australia.


Brett Thompson is the CEO of the Queensland Homicide Victims’ Support Group and, since 2011, has worked in executive management roles in the not-for-profit sector advocating for community members requiring support.


Monique Ulrick-Hunter holds a Bachelor of Laws and an admitted solicitor. Monique is a Sessional Member (Legal) for the Mental Health Review Tribunal and an active member of Amnesty International since 1997. She previously worked as an Official Visitor (Legal) for the Department of Community Safety. Monique has experience across civil and criminal jurisdictions, including with the Director of Public Prosecutions (NSW) and Queensland Police Service.


David Wenitong is an Aboriginal man from the Gubbi Gubbi Tribal/Language group, and of South Sea Islander descendent. He holds a Bachelor of Laws from Central Queensland University. David has worked as a Solicitor with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service in family, civil and criminal law and is currently employed as a Independent Patient Rights Adviser with Queensland Health.


Janine Wiles holds a Bachelor of Arts and is a defence security professional with a focus on security and incident review. Janine also has strong connections with the LGBTQI community.


Barbara Williams holds a Master of Social Work and previously held the position of Official Visitor, and most recently, External Inspector for the Office of the Chief Inspector for Queensland Corrective Services. Barbara has held senior management positions across state government including the Department of Communities and Department of Child Safety, as well as community service organisations such as Life without Barriers.


Mark Zeller is admitted as a solicitor and has worked with Indigo Law since 2016.  Mark was formerly a Senior Constable with the Queensland Police Service. He also provides volunteer legal services to disadvantaged community members through Micah Projects.

Past Members

Kylie Anderson was appointed Professional Board Member on 3 July 2017. She holds a Master of Laws, Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of International Relations. Kylie was admitted as a Barrister of the Supreme Court of Queensland in November 1999.

Kylie has more than 20 years practical experience having previously worked at Legal Aid Queensland, the Public Solicitor’s Office in the Solomon Islands and the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services. She also has experience as a consultant, adviser and senior manager in government and in international organizations: The Asia Foundation; United Nations Children’s Fund.


Beverley Russell was appointed Professional Board Member on 3 July 2017. She holds postgraduate nursing qualifications in mental health, alcohol and drugs and a Master of Social Sciences with a major in criminology. Beverley was a member of the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal from 2006–2011 and a member of the Mental Health Review Tribunal from 2002–2008. Prior to her appointment, she was team leader for the Prison Mental Health Service with the West Moreton Hospital and Health Service.

Last updated: 1 July 2020
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